You are here: Home Features Afghanistan: Female volunteers make healthcare services accessible in villages
Afghanistan: Female volunteers make healthcare services accessible in villages

May 30, 2013

The Afghan Red Crescent Society has adopted an integrated methodology to addressing health issues – the community-based health and first aid (CBHFA) approach.

Afghanistan has the highest maternal mortality rate in the world and is second for under-five mortality. Poor and improper nutrition among women of reproductive age can lead to pregnancy-related complications, there is an acute shortage of health facilities and trained staff – particularly female staff – access to antenatal care and essential medicine is limited, and most of the population lacks access to basic health and sanitation services.

In order to address these health challenges, the Afghan Red Crescent Society has adopted an integrated methodology to addressing health issues – the community-based health and first aid (CBHFA) approach.

In a country with the challenges of poor infrastructure, extreme poverty, high illiteracy and gender inequalities, the National Society has learnt that putting women at the centre of maternal, newborn and child health interventions is critical. Female volunteers are being trained and empowered at the local level to raise awareness around health-seeking behaviours and contribute towards reducing maternal mortality.

Female trainers who work on the condition that they are accompanied by their male relatives have travelled to remote regions of the country to sensitize community leaders about the benefits of involving women in health promotion.

The National Society has been able to recruit and train women in remote villages, where one of the main challenges has been a high illiteracy rate. In Afghanistan 50 per cent of the men and 85 per cent of women are illiterate. To ensure that the volunteers learn the key health messages accurately, the Red Crescent trainers use innovative ways of teaching, such as using simple visual aids adapted to the local context to promote behavioural change in health, first aid and safety practices.

Click here for more.

SOURCE: IFRC

Most Read
Most Shared
You May Like
search

blank.gif

blank.gif

CRFC: Toll free number

Global Goals 2030
 
OneWorld South Asia Group of Websites