You are here: Home Features Indian children use film to take a stand against sexual abuse
Indian children use film to take a stand against sexual abuse

Sep 20, 2012

Plan India’s film Chuppi Todo (Break the Silence) entertains while exploring the oft-ignored issue of child sexual abuse and how to recognise, protest and report it. Delhi has the highest rate of crime against children and India as a whole has the world’s largest number of sexually abused children.

Most of us watch films to be entertained, but sometimes a movie can transcend boundaries and become something far more powerful. In India, Chuppi Todo (Break the Silence) is a case in point. It’s a motion picture that entertains while exploring the oft-ignored issue of sexual abuse and how to recognise, protest and report it.

girlindia.jpg

This movie, as well as 2 television ads, is a key component of Plan India’s Delhi-based campaign to end child sexual abuse. Launched in June 2011, the campaign is a partnership with the Delhi Commission for the Protection of Child Rights, the Ministry for Women’s and Children’s Development, and 15 non-governmental organisations (NGOs), as well as cable networks and media houses.

The need for talk was urgent. Delhi has the highest rate of crime against children and India as a whole has the world’s largest number of sexually abused children. In fact, at any given point in time, 1 Indian child in ten is being sexually abused.

Knowledge gained

At every screening -- and each NGO held at least a dozen, reaching more than 200 child clubs and 50 women’s groups – there was a Q&A session hosted by a child rights professional or a child psychologist.

Child actors in the film said they acted in the movie as a way top tell other children that it’s OK to speak out against abuse. The growth in awareness was substantial and members of the community, children and adults alike, became a newfound force for fighting sexual abuse.

Loud and clear

Children have received a helping hand from the media. For a whole month, Delhi Aaj Tak and other television channels showed advertisements about the gravity of sexual abuse. In addition, 30 journalists were trained and were soon providing active coverage of the campaign.

The assistance of teachers, police officers and members of district-level child welfare committees was also enlisted once they had been trained by Plan India staff.

Child survivors now report abuses and get help. In some cases, child protection committees have been able to prosecute perpetrators and even put them behind bars.

Plan India plans to slowly roll out this campaign around the rest of the country, building the necessary social infrastructure, establishing referral units, disseminating messages through schools, engaging the media and training a band of counsellors.

Most Read
Most Shared
You May Like
search

blank.gif

blank.gif

CRFC: Toll free number

Global Goals 2030
 
OneWorld South Asia Group of Websites