You are here: Home News Fighting AIDS: A long way to ‘Zero’
Fighting AIDS: A long way to ‘Zero’

Dec 02, 2013

As a virus, AIDS has proved remarkably resourceful, outwitting scientists and keeping a vaccine or cure out of reach, says James Robertson, Executive Director of India HIV/AIDS Alliance.

James Robertson

‘Getting to zero’ is the theme of this year's World AIDS Day. It is an ambitious goal, to be sure. Three goals, in fact. Three zeros. Zero new HIV infections. Zero AIDS deaths. Zero stigma and discrimination. Are we now so close to declaring victory? Are we really on a path to an AIDS-free world? Is the end of AIDS on the horizon?

On one hand, we have never been better positioned to achieve such goals. We have good epidemiological data. We know where the epidemic thrives. We know who are most at risk, and we have the tools to reduce their vulnerability. For those infected, we have treatment.

Yet mastering this epidemic remains elusive. Why does there still seem to be zero chance that we will reach any of UNAIDS' zero targets anytime soon? Although it's no longer popular to say so, AIDS remains exceptional. As a virus, it has proved remarkably resourceful, outwitting scientists and keeping a vaccine or cure out of reach.

But for all its microscopic muscularity, HIV is still winning because we're letting it win. Those most at risk — sex workers, men who have sex with men, people who inject drugs, transgenders and hijras — remain on the margins, socially stigmatized and victimized by legal discrimination. People living with HIV bear a daily burden of society's cruelty and inaction.

Don't get me wrong. Things are better than they've ever been, but better isn't good enough. Our tools and knowledge can only stifle this epidemic if they are marshaled to the task. Government coordination must be matched with community mobilization and sustained in collaboration with civil society. National treasuries, donor governments, corporate houses and private citizens alike need to pitch in to support these efforts.

This World AIDS Day, even as we appreciate progress in India and elsewhere, we should not lose our momentum or let disintegratethe foundation that has been built in the quarter century since the first World AIDS Day in 1988. The path to zero is still long, even if the destination is clear.

Most Read
Most Shared
You May Like
search

blank.gif

blank.gif

CRFC: Toll free number

Global Goals 2030
 
OneWorld South Asia Group of Websites