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What women want

Feb 06, 2009

UNIFEM's global report Progress of the World's Women 2008/2009 calls for stronger accountability systems to meet international commitments on women's rights. It says gender equality must become a standard against which public performance is assessed and women must be included in this decision-making process.

Progress of the World's Women 2008/2009

Publisher: UNIFEM, 2008

This report features new data providing clear evidence that women's empowerment and gender equality are drivers for reducing poverty, building food security, reducing maternal mortality, and enhancing the effectiveness of aid.

UNIFEM 2008.gif

It provides an assessment of each of the Millennium Development Goals from a gender perspective and focuses on five key areas where the need to strengthen accountability to women is urgent: politics and governance, access to public services, economic opportunities, justice and distribution of international assistance for development and security.

The report’s key findings and recommendations are:

  • Multilateral aid and security institutions can do much more to meet their own commitments and standards on gender equality
  • Public service delivery that responds to women’s needs is the real litmus test of government accountability. Women continue to face barriers to health, education and agricultural support services
  • A gendered difference in perceptions of corruption is seen in most parts of the world. Women may also experience corruption differently from men, for instance, when sexual extortion is one of the forms in which informal payments are extracted
  • Even though in the last decade the number of women parliamentarians at the national level has increased by eight percent to a global average of 18.4 percent, developing countries will still not reach the “parity zone” of 40-60 percent until 2045
  • Real improvement in women’s access to justice needs gender-based changes in law enforcement and informal justice institutions
  • Women are extremely vulnerable to shifting patterns in global markets in the absence of measures that protect them, such as during the recent food crisis. This has implications for women’s economic leadership in developing countries.
Source : UNIFEM
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